Hook, Line and Sinker by Judy Van Put

Hook, Line and Sinker is a (seasonal) weekly column by Judy Van Put that provides information on local fishing conditions and activities, primarily focusing on the trout fisheries of Pepacton Reservoir and nearby streams and rivers./p>

Hook, Line and Sinker: August 3, 2011

Al Carpenter of Al’s Sports Shop in Downsville reported on the winners of the July Pepacton Trout Derby. Capturing the first prize was Ed Brown of Walton for his winning fish that tipped the scales at 11 pounds, five ounces, and measured 28 inches. Ed was trolling with a Michigan Stinger to catch his trout. Winning second prize was Al Lutkins from New Jersey for his 10-pound, 12-ounce brown trout that measured all of 29 and-one-quarter inches in length.


Hook, Line and Sinker: July 27, 2011

This Thursday, July 28 is a very special day. Don Tracy of Susquehanna, Pennsylvania sent out a notice that it’s the 4th Annual “Fishing With the Blind” day. Each year a group of about 25 blind/partially blind folks from the NYC area gather to spend a week in July at “The Land of the Vikings,” a local resort located about two miles from the Hale Eddy bridge.


Hook, Line and Sinker: June 30, 2010

I recently bought a pair of Ono’s polarized sunglasses with built-in readers. For the past two years I’ve needed magnifiers in order to tie on a fly or change a tippet, and the last pair I had were so uncomfortable and heavy that they kept pulling the brim of my hat further down over my eyes.


Hook, Line and Sinker: May 26, 2010

Fishing conditions on the Pepacton Reservoir have been pretty good according to Sonny Somelofski of the Tremperskill Country Store. Up at the source end of Pepacton, fishermen have been finding the trout down about 20 to 23 feet, and have had success using sawbellies, shiners, and Krocodile lures. Another popular lure is the large Mepps Squirrel Tail spinner.


Hook, Line and Sinker: May 19, 2010

Area rivers and streams are a bit low for this time of year, but have been fishing well. According to the United States Geological Survey website, the Beaverkill at Cooks Falls is flowing at 300 cubic feet per second (cfs). The average flow on this date is 519 cfs.