Mailbag

Sept. 9, 2009: Hope vs. fear is the real story

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To The Editor:
In the recent “Mailbag,” letter by Stuart E. Buswell, “human beings are the problem” demands response. He makes several points regarding the environmental debate. Many of his points are in seeming contradiction to others within.


Sept. 2, 2009: Opportunity lost with theater project

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To The Editor:
I am somewhat shocked that the decision by Jonathan Starch and David France to sell the Galli-Curci Theatre hasn’t elicited more of a reaction here, but a few well-written letters and rebuttals. Lost in the lines of type is what these gentlemen were trying to do for Margaretville. I will admit that I know little about the disputed property and subsequent lawsuits other than what I’ve read in this paper, and quite frankly, I don’t care.


Sept. 2, 2009: Blame the rich for resort problems

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To The Editor:
John and Janet Fishkind latest — accusing Save the Mountain supporters of “extreme negativity toward development of the recreation and tourism component of our community,” ranks right up there with last week’s charge that we were happy the Galli Curci Theater reopening had fallen through. If you asked every person who has a Save the Mountain lawn sign in front of their house, I doubt you could find one who is against either reopening the Galli Curci Theater or recreation and tourism!


Sept. 2, 2009: Make way for eminent domain

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To The Editor:
I was saddened to learn a few weeks ago about the demise of the planned Margaretville theatre. Steve Finkel’s letter offered a wonderful answer to the cancelled Galli-Curci plans. Let the town/village step in. Brillant.


Sept. 2, 2009: Reservoir water not fit to drink

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To The Editor:
I read Brian Sweeney’s article regarding spraying to kill weeds under the guardrails around the New York City reservoirs with dismay. New York City has spent millions building sewerage treatment plants, upgrading septic systems and acquiring land to prevent development. They have seized land and demanded that local residents forego economic development in order to protect the city’s drinking water.


Sept. 2, 2009: They saved us from bigger problems

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To The Editor:
A recent letter claims the “negativity to development” of Save the Mountain had the “unintended consequences” of the “most severely depressed economy in the entire region” for 40 years. Haven’t the letter writers tuned into the news this past year?


Sept. 2, 2009: Need a better way to kill the weeds

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To The Editor:
The Catskill Center for Conservation and Development would like to commend the Catskill Mountain News and Brian Sweeney for the excellent piece of investigative journalism that appeared in last week’s edition on the application of herbicides in and around the Town of Middletown. This is an issue that The Catskill Center has been concerned about not only within the confines of the Catskill Park and Forest Preserve and the NYC Watershed, but throughout the more than 6,000 square-mile Catskill Mountain Region.


Sept. 2, 2009: Local baseball legend is still a star

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To The Editor:
Last week Gene Fix wrote about his truly fantastic accomplishments as a pitcher at Margaretville Central School. When Gene was a junior, I was in seventh grade at Fleischmanns. I kept the score book for the Fleischmanns Varsity team. I idolized Gene. He was the best pitcher I ever saw, poetry in motion.


August 26, 2009: Group's unintended consequences

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To The Editor:
Save the Mountain claims to favor development in the villages and hamlets, but when coupled with their extreme negativity toward development of the recreation and tourism component of our community, the “unintended consequence” is the most severely depressed economy seen in the entire region during the 40 years that we’ve enjoyed the northern Catskills.


August 26, 2009: Human beings are the problem

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To The Editor:
In last week’s mailbag Ed Kirstein took exception to my use of the adjective fanatic to characterize those who promote global warming as an unchallenged scientific fact. I stated I thought, quite plainly, that I make no judgment of their thesis as to whether it was right or wrong.


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